Feeding

Helping children make better choices

Two women with a driving passion to see hungry people in their communities well fed, are pooling their expertise, experience and resources to make a difference in the nutrition landscape in Ethekwini.

Watch their conversation here

Cathy Whittle of The Domino Foundation’s Nutrition Programme and Jabu Nkomo of Isheq Solutions have been collaborating for four years to instill an awareness of a healthy and affordable eating lifestyle within the Early Childhood Development Centres and schools. Undernutrition and essential nutrient deficiencies results in 38% of South African children under five years old, suffering from SWO i.e. stunting, wasting and obesity. Jabu commented that, against the background of poor diet in the formative years, the starch-heavy menus of many Mzansi homes are contributing significantly to extremely high incidences of diabetes and high blood pressure, and dependence on chronic medication.

“We have worked hard to change the mind-sets of the adults, but have found too often they are entrenched in their old ways. We have realised that a far more effective way is to teach the children at an early age that a far brighter future is waiting for them if they eat healthily”.

In Domino’s Nutrition space where, in 2020, 367,000 meals were prepared and delivered to beneficiaries on the foundation’s ECD, Babies’ Home and Life Skills Programmes, has grown the fundamental understanding that hungry or malnourished people need to be empowered to make good decisions about how they are going to feed themselves. Cathy added: “The old adage says ‘You are what you eat’, should be changed to ‘How you eat today, you will pay for tomorrow’ positively or negatively”. She and Jabu see that whatever food is offered, nutritious or otherwise, will be gratefully accepted but, with an understanding of ‘what will benefit my body in the long-run’, that will only be a stop-gap solution.

The collaboration between Domino and Ishaq is taking them into the 64 crèches where the foundation’s ECD (Early Childhood Development) Programme works alongside the owners and staff to empower them to enable the little people in their charge, to make healthier food choices. Jabu said that initial attempts to train the owners in good nutritional habits encountered challenges, because of a lack of resources and of a perception that good nutrition really wasn’t that important in the scale of what the crèches were offering. Cathy pointed out that for so long the crèches have been seen by the communities they serve and by the owners themselves purely as child-minding facilities.

The ECD Programme has implemented a far more holistic training for the crèches’ staffs to set the children on a sound path to school-readiness, which includes sound nutrition. The women on the programme now understand why proper nutrition is important, not only for good physical development, but also for cognitive development in the pre-schoolers in the crèches.

“We call it ‘Food For Thought’!”, Cathy volunteered. The supply of nutrients or the lack of nutrients is critical in brain development just as they are vital in all the other parts of the body.

Jabu has developed material for the training of ECD teachers to improve their own health and lives and then to inspire and equip them to train the children in their care. The Bible states a strong foundational principal for all who take their responsibility for children seriously: “Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it”, (Proverbs 22:6). “We see many children bringing junk food to school. Their parents see the brightly packaged ‘snacks’ as signs that they are making good and can afford the taste treats the advertising tells them they should be buying”, said Jabu, “but now, with training, the teachers are able to say with the authority which comes with being ‘qualified’ that there is a better way. Jabu’s training materials include recipes which map out meals through the day and a possible afternoon snack.

She has seen that it doesn’t work to say a blanket “No!” to all junk food. Instead, she says that giving options, along with the understanding of how crucial good eating is to good living, helps the children (and their parents) feel they are making healthy decisions for themselves.

Jabu, as a member of the same community where she sees poor eating habits all around her, is adamant that an understanding of the culture, the community, the thought processes must be taken into consideration and only then that the academic knowledge be applied to that overall scenario. She says that eating the cabbages and beans grown in more rural communities is seen as an indication of a lack of money and status. Moving to an urban environment means that people feel the pressure to abandon that ‘poor man’s diet’. Cathy added that, “If we can change the nutrition landscape in the ECD centres and show that it is radically benefitting the children, then we have a powerful tool to demonstrate to the wider community that, as actor Robert Urich said, “a healthy outside starts from the inside””. When measured against the demonstrable obesity, wasting and stunting seen before, the positive results of new eating habits, both child and parent can see the internal and external effects of what is put in their mouths.

The Nutrition Programme provides the crèches with nutritious meals every weekday during the school term. This has proved a great draw-card for daily attendance. In this way, good nutrition and good academic instruction are helping the children achieve their developmental milestones.

A basic menu has been developed which ensures good nutrition for the children. Breakfast is a high protein soy-based porridge supplied by one of Domino’s partners, Joint Aid Management (JAM). Lunch is delivered to crèches and consists of a beef bone and vegetable soup made with mixed legumes. The crèches choose if they serve the soup with bread, pap or rice. The programme equips the crèches to prepare their own meals in year 3.

A challenge arises when the children are not at school during school holidays. Cathy pointed out that this is where educating parents is critical to help their offspring to make better food choices when they are away from the provided meals at school.

Some of the crèches have cooking facilities and the joint aim of Domino’s ECD and Nutrition Programmes  is to nurture a partnership with them that builds capacity for them to ultimately provide this nutrition for themselves. Equipping the cooks with the understanding that protein-fortified foods bolster nutrition, which enhances the learners’ cognitive capabilities and strengthens their healthy physical growth, is imperative if the active learning is to take place. Jabu described the three phases of developing the nutrition programme in schools

  • Phase 1, schools receive pre-cooked soup;
  • Phase 2, they receive the makings of soup to cook themselves
  • Phase 3, crèches are sufficiently equipped to stand alone. Site visits track and report on the progress each crèche is making. The Nutrition team provides porridge in the morning and soup for lunch and is committed to influencing the way food is prepared at the centres.

When asked about tracking the impact of the Nutrition Programme on children’s progress towards school readiness, Cath pointed to Domino’s ECD team’s 150 Tool which has been developed by the Domino Foundation, in line with the Department of Social Development’s guidelines on ECD Centre management. The impact of any intervention has to measured, adjusted and evaluated against the expected outcomes as to its success, insights and failures. “Domino has created its own ECD 150 Tool (based off the DSD Guidelines for Minimum Crèche Requirements) with 150 key measurement indicators to assess, evaluate and track the progress within each ECD. The field workers and monitors visit each ECD centre on a weekly basis to assist with understanding, implementing techniques, skills and lessons learned. This change-management monitoring tool is at the core of the success of this enterprise and educational development programme, The measurement and evaluation of the impact of improved nutrition is a vital part of that.”

The ECD Programme not only mentors crèche staff in teaching methods but also gives training to the owners in good business practice. Cathy said that the programme had noted that crèches where its training as a whole, coupled with the input from the Nutrition Programme and Ishaq had been fully embraced, the owners now felt in a far stronger position to charge realistic fees which, in turn, meant the crèches could be better run. On the other hand, some crèches with little or no business training had been nervous to charge appropriately.

Both Jabu and Cathy were emphatic that the Domino/Ishaq partnership has a bright future with Jabu committed to doing yearly training on nutrition with the crèches and schools.

Jabu had the last word: “We know it’s easy to say that we are feeding for the future: the reality is that good nutrition in these early days of a child’s life spells a better future not only for that child but for South Africa as a whole. If we change an individual, we can change a whole community and then we can see the possibility of changing the nation.”

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Bread and Butter Champions

There’s a gentle hum of happy industry in The Domino Foundation’s Nutrition Programme kitchen in Amazimtoti. The five volunteers who have gathered for the weekly buttering-spreading-wrapping routine have it down to a fine art: 1,200 peanut butter sandwiches ready to be delivered to 13 schools, ECD (Early Childhood Development) centres, churches and a community centre, some well beyond a 20 kilometre radius of the kitchen which is situated at Kingsway Church International, Doonside.

Team leader, Cheryl Dann, proudly exclaimed: “These are my champions! They faithfully give of their time and energy to ensure that 1,000 children on the sandwich programme and the 3,000 on porridge programme get some nutritious food. We call this the learners’ ‘food for thought’ because studies have shown that healthy food isn’t only for good physical growth. It is also essential for the way children’s brains develop. And these generous people are making sure that the children get it.”

Two of the volunteers, Lizzy Cullen and Pat Manton, have been regulars since 2016 when the kitchen started operating. Lizzy said: “Besides the fulfilment and reward of knowing that we are helping to feed desperately hungry children, it is also helping us as individuals.   Being a volunteer at the Toti Kitchen enables us to join a ‘sandwich family that cares for the community and for us as individuals”.  Pat added: “It keeps us young and our minds busy and we have amazing fellowship and made so many friends!   My favourite is when we visit the schools and get to love and care for the children!” 

The preparation of the “sarmies” isn’t the exclusive preserve of the gentler sex. Andre Botes, a retired Seadoone Mall car guard, was adamant when he said: “A real man can rustle up a mean sandwich!” When Andre first got in touch with the Nutrition team, he was helped with food hampers until they were able to get him into a retirement home.  Making sandwiches is Andre’s way of giving back to the community.  Cheryl said: “We have ‘adopted’ him at Domino and this is really a picture of the saying that God sets the lonely in families. We are thrilled that Andre is part of our ‘extended family’!”

Cheryl said that the Nutrition Programme would love to give other members of the communities on the South Coast the chance to also be part of the answer to keeping children in school and developing well both physically and intellectually. Anyone who is interested in donating peanut butter for these sarmies or finding out the roles they could play are welcome to contact her on 083 201 0554 or nutritionsouth@domino.org.za.

#lonelynomore #menspreadingbread

Caption: Male volunteers spreading the peanut butter at The Domino Foundation’s Nutrition programme’s kitchen in Toti: (lleft to right) Tim Dann; Calvin van der Merwe and Andre Botes.

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How can we B-BBEE of added value to your business right now?


DO YOU HAVE A FEBRUARY 2021 FINANCIAL YEAR END?
 
Great! Then this is a helpful reminder, to all our corporate business partners, who are preparing for your February Financial Year End, that we are here to support you, as you invest in the communities we serve together.
 
We would love to assist you to finalise your B-BBEE spend, and align your CSI Strategy with some/all of our existing community programmes. Added to that, our initiatives build towards achieving some of the Global Sustainable Development Goals, as well as the National Development Plan

So please contact our Donor Relations Team, Karen Brokensha on karen@domino.org.za or Tarin Stevenson on tarin@domino.org.za or or call the office on 031 563 9605 today, so they can help you!

YOU ONLY HAVE A JUNE/DECEMBER 2021 FINANCIAL YEAR END?

That’s also awesome, our Donor Duo would so appreciate the opportunity to connect with you over Zoom, a telephone call, email or better still a socially distanced coffee (in the open air of our coffee shop) to help you navigate these COVID CSI waters, discuss your up and coming business B-BBEE requirements, and assess how The Domino Foundation can be of benefit to your organisation for the good.
 
DON’T PROCRASTINATE – DOMINATE!

Kind regards, Shaun Tait
CEO of The Domino Foundation Team

The Domino Foundation can assist you with a number of elements on the B-BBEE scorecard, providing sustainable transformation throughout our nation and they are:

1. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (SED)
2. ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT (ED)

3. SKILLS DEVELOPMENT (SKILLS)

As your community centric transformation partner, we are committed to a process that gives you the business advantage by maximising your B-BBEE spend, as well as aligning to programmes that speak to your hearts and values.
 
THIS IS DEFINITELY A WIN-WIN!

DOMINO supports over 13,556 vulnerable individuals in communities and we rely on donor/partners like yourself to help sustain our transformation initiatives.

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Food for good thoughts

Goal – To feed the hungry children in our peri-urban schools, churches and crèches and supplement nutritional well being of learners where the government are not feeding vulnerable children.

This update is from Cath Whittle who heads up Nutrition in North Durban.

“We really want to send a massive thank you out to all our business partners who make this programme so effective and nutritious. Our morning meal is a high protein porridge from Jam SA, on the sandwich front we partner with Cheval Eggs, RCL Foods (Peanut Butter and Mayonnaise), Isiqalo Food (Margarine) and Premier Bread, and are so grateful to the Unilever office team and our many amazing volunteers for making 5,810 delicious, healthy ‘samies’ for school learners. In addition many of our partnering Early Childhood Development Centres also make soups, and we get a power packed soup mix powder from Unilever, high protein legume mix from Container Ministries and beef bones from Ellis Park Butchery. This is incredible community collaboration for the benefit of healthy children” says Cath Whittle who heads up Nutrition in North Durban.

And Cheryl Dann shared her news from Nutrition in South Durban (Amanzimtoti)

“School nutrition continues to take place, although two schools have dropped off the programme, making space for two new ones. Collection of updated registers, ID documents and paper work continues to be a very slow administration process but does not dampen our spirits as we have a team of amazing volunteers who love to make sandwiches in support of the work we do and they earnestly pray for every child too!

In Quarter One we made and delivered 6,984 sandwiches and are absolutely delighted to have Amanzimtoti High School come back on the programme with 4 children who we are grateful to send food for. We also distributed monthly Relief Hampers to partnering churches, schools and community centres i.e. Cedar Hill Church, KCI Church, Holy Sabbath Church of God, Young Stars Development and Qinselani Primary School.

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EGG-STATIC!

 

The response to The Domino Foundation’s appeal for Easter eggs was overwhelming. Every child on the Foundation’s Feeding programme received a chocolate-covered symbol of new life, the triumphant message of the Easter story. Schools, church groups, companies, families and individuals showed great generosity in the almost 9000 eggs they donated. Working together with Cathy Whittle, leader of the Feeding programme, Pippa Coote of Sprout Consulting, galvanised various businesses enterprises to bring in 4500 of the eggs. The young leaners at Qalakahle Crèche, Mansell Road, Stamford Hill, were delighted with the taste treat brought by the Easter Rabbit. Their crèche was one among the many which were blessed through the generosity of so many. Other channels through and to which eggs were distributed were The Domino Foundation’s Feeding, Babies’ Home, Life Skills and Red Light programmes, creches in Amaoti, Waterloo, the Durban CBD and the Point area, Glenridge, Anthem and Every Nation Churches, Youth for Christ, Mildene Retirement Village and Villa Sunfield old age home and frail care facility. On behalf of all those who were blessed by the wide and generous response to our appeal, we say “Thank you!” It was an Easter to remember!

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FEEDING UPDATE 1st QUARTER

The first few months of 2018 has seen significant growth in the scope of the Feeding programme. Victor Daitz, a humanitarian who supported a wide spectrum of causes and uplifted the lives of many, set up a foundation with the aim of establishing a better life for disadvantaged South Africans. Funding from the Victor Daitz Foundation for 2018 has helped enormously in enabling the Feeding programme to expand its operations, particularly in the areas of Amaoti, Waterloo and Matikwe, North of Durban.

Marcus Kelly, storeroom coordinator, loading relief packs at the new storeroom.

The Stichting Nelis van Dril, a trust based in Holland and which established a relationship with The Domino Foundation in 2017, is fully funding the feeding in the twenty or so institutions in Inanda which came under the Foundation’s umbrella through its Feeding programme. Liesbeth Nicolai, the point-of-contact between the Dutch and Domino, is continuing her involvement with her extensive experience and relationship built with the communities over a quarter of a century, while the Feeding programme supplies the logistical support. The character of the feeding in these areas is different to that already established in the other crèches and schools where prepared meals are supplied. Liesbeth says, “We give the beneficiaries the dried goods, like Morevite and maize meal, with which they prepare the meals. I like to go on the delivery rounds once a month so that I can keep contact with the people I have come to know so well over many years.”

Leader of the feeding programme, Cathy Whittle, says that exciting opportunities to build with other churches are being embraced with a number of them now benefitting from The Domino Foundation’s Feeding programme’s resources and acting as distribution points. With Domino’s Feeding programme as the administrative conduit and each church responsible for distribution after delivery, these groups’ outreaches no longer have to carry the administrative and logistical burdens which are so often challenges for many organisations. This is proving an excellent example of the Foundation providing infrastructural support to allow other groups and outreach initiatives to flourish.

Under the leadership of Lucky Vilakazi and as part of the ongoing vision to empower the Feeding programme’s beneficiaries, the Brookdale Soup Kitchen has standardised its soup recipe. This means that ingredients for the soup can now be supplied to institutions in new areas rather than pre-prepared soup being delivered from the kitchen. The aim is to empower each school to make their own soup and to have the Domino kitchen staff teach each crèche basic nutrition standards. It is gratifying to see the capacity of the Soup Kitchen growing.

The Feeding programme’s extremely beneficial relationship with ‘JAM South Africa’ continues to flourish. With poverty threatening the early development of the majority of South African children, the partnership is addressing the nutritional needs of children in the Feeding programme, setting them on the path to growing into healthy adults. Realising the importance of early childhood development and along with the sandwiches and soup supplied by the programme, JAM’s high protein porridge is a vital component in the growing children’s diet.

Through the Feeding programme, the aim is to grow ‘JAM Feeding’ through site-specific churches. The Domino Foundation delivers the 25 kg bags of porridge to each church which then acts as a central distribution node to the crèches with whom it already have a relationship. With repetition, this creates an efficient distribution-through-relationship model. Glenridge Church is the first church to implement the model. A nutritional food hygiene programme for each of the crèches is being formulated and a generic crèche report being compiled to create a rating system to measure the infrastructure of the crèches and to assess individual needs.

The South Feeding programme in Amanzimtoti, working under ‘Kingsway Church International’ (KCi), has found new premises for The Domino Foundation Toti Kitchen as from May 2018. With the exciting development of taking on an extra 3000 beneficiaries in May, the programme is finding its capacities stretched and is offering potential donors and partners to come on board to support the logistical side of operations in the areas of transport and large electrical equipment like freezers. With a total of 49 000 sandwiches having been supplied to sixteen institutions in the first term, the programme also continues to supply schools, churches and centres with bread, peanut butter and margarine, to create a self-help culture among the beneficiary groups. Never shy of taking on new challenges, team leader, Cheryl Dann, is negotiating with JAM to take over the crèches under the KwaMakutha Organisation of Crèches.

If you would like to partner with our Feeding programme, please contact Cathy Whittle (feeding@domino.org.za) for North of the Umgeni River or Cheryl Dann (feedingtoti@domino.org.za) for South Feeding support.

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2016: What a year!

This year has been a time of exponential growth, tough challenges, our faith been tested and of course, many lives been changed. In 2016 alone we’ve been able to impact the lives of over 5000 individuals on a daily basis. During our journey we’ve seen 3 key areas being highlighted:


1. Increasing our areas of influence

A big cause for celebration has been The Domino Foundation moving from being a North Durban NPO to a nationwide NPO.

We’re excited to announce that The Domino Foundation’s areas of influence now include: Waterloo, Oshebni, Amanzimtoti, Inner city Durban and Cape Town. We’ve also continued to strengthen our existing relationships with donors, volunteers, NPOS and governmental departments like the Department of Home Affairs, the Department of Social Development and the National Prosecuting Authority.


2.Partnering with local churches

We have loved partnering with other churches to outwork their social justice initiatives.

This year we’ve partnered with Glenridge (Durban Inner City) and The Rock (Umhlanga) through the outworking of the Red light Anti-Human Trafficking programme; Life Changers (Tableview, Cape Town) for the Recycle Swop Shop and Kingsway Church International (Amanzimtoti) to open another sandwich kitchen. As we’ve been able to share our experience, skills, knowledge and feeding expertise we’ve seen an incredible growth in the Amanzimtoti Sandwich Kitchen. In just eight months the kitchen has grown to preparing 660 sandwiches a week – an incredible growth rate!


3.Beneficiary Impact

We started the year with four programmes and expanded to seven community transformational initiatives.

Babies’ Homes – We provided a loving, family environment for 15 children in our two transitional homes with 6 babies being adopted into their ‘forever homes’.

Life Skills Programme– We worked with 4 under-resourced primary schools and 726 children on a weekly basis through lessons, one-on-one counselling sessions and after school activities – all aiming to empower learners to make wise life choices.

ECD Programme– We started the year upskilling and transforming 23 crèches into sustainable small businesses and places of active learning and increased to 44 establishments by year-end. Our work in the ECD space ensures that over children are receiving quality foundation-phase development throughout KZN.

Feeding Programme– We opened an additional kitchen to feed the south Durban basin, as well as added an additional 17 establishments (a combination of crèches/kindergartens and primary schools) to our feeding programme across KZN. By the year-end we were feeding a total of 55 establishments and averaging an incredible 98 000 meals a month!

Red light Anti-Human Trafficking – This programme joined Domino in 2016 and in 2017 we look forward to welcoming 8 ladies into our programme where they’ll be assisted, cared for, restored and released.

Recycle Swop Shops – The social justice and environmental programme joined Domino in 2016 with three swop shops operating in the Western Cape.

Bursary Programme – In 2017 the programme will fund 5 students’ tertiary education, giving them the opportunity to build themselves a future through education.


Thanks to donors and volunteers, your support has enabled us to continue changing thousands of lives through showing mercy, combatting injustice and empowering individuals throughout our beautiful country of South Africa. If you would like to partner with us for 2017 please let us know.


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Stories from the kitchen: 3rd Quarter 2016

This past month The Domino Foundation reached a MASSIVE milestone, preparing and delivering 90 000 meals for the hungry in our community!

Thanks to the generosity of local business, schools, and individuals we’re able to impact so many children and adults monthly, an incredible opportunity to impact lives. Our Sandwich Kitchen based in Durban North prepares and delivers on average 4 700 sandwiches per week to a number of hospitals and church ministries and Durban schools where learners don’t have a packed lunch. This number doesn’t include sandwiches, which get donated from Danville Park Girls High School, Our Lady of Fatima and Maris Stella School and Bread Buddies.

Our Toti kitchen, run in partnership with Kingsway Church International, has grown in leaps and since it opened in April bounds thanks to the support of the local community. Almost 6 000 sandwiches have been distributed averaging 350 a week since the opening. These sarmies go to two schools and one crèche.

Recently the Grade 8’s and 9’s of Embury College became more aware of the plight of some of our hungry children and delivered peanut butter and mayonnaise and then made 200 sandwiches. The Toti Kitchen has also given out 30 relief packs to families in crisis in the area and is helping to deliver JAM porridge to two crèches in the Ezimbokindweni area.

Thank you to everyone who has a heart for feeding and contributes – your support, donations and volunteer time is impacting lives. Just ask the teacher from Doon Heights Primary!

 

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Stories from the Kitchen: 2nd Quarter 2016

The Feeding Programme has been exceptionally busy over the last few months, an exciting sign in realising our vision of communities where no child is to hungry to concentrate or learn. This is especially important as more and more families battle to provide enough nutritious meals in South Africa’s growing food crisis which has been further negatively affected by the weakening rand. Simply, families cannot afford to buy food and if they do it’s too little or not nearly nutritious enough.

In light of this the Domino Foundation bought attention to World Hunger Day through the “Fight the Plight” initiative, raising funds for our feeding programmes that distribute over 3500 meals every school day through our two sandwich kitchens (Durban and Toti) and our soup Kitchen in Brookdale. Our Relief Kitchen provides relief hampers and meals to families in crisis.

The month of May also saw the exciting launch of the Sandwich Kitchen in Amanzimtoti in partnership with Kingsway Church International. Working closely with local schools to identify the most vulnerable learners the Toti Sandwich provides delicious sandwiches to these schoolchildren who don’t have a packed lunch. The Toti Feeding Kitchen is currently making and delivering 30 sandwiches to each of the three participating schools daily with hopes to expand the programme soon.

Just to get a snapshot of how massive and far reaching the feeding programme is,  for the month of May alone 78 640 meals were prepared and delivered to vulnerable communities of Durban and 600 sandwiches were prepared and delivered from Toti. The Feeding Programme has also welcomed three new Amaoti creches totalling 50 more kids and is about to start training four new schools in the Point area – Pickering Street, Winder Street and Point Rd (Mahatma Ghandi Rd). Children from these schools will receive JAM porridge daily.

If you have a heart for feeding and want to know more about our programme and how to get involved have a look at our detailed and informative #KnowYourNPO posts on #Feeding. We’d love to have you!

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New season, new roles

With a new season comes new leadership. As the Domino Foundation increases its capacity to reach more communities there have been some internal shifts to ensure that the hands who do this work are passionate, skilled and ready to impact lives.

At the beginning of the year Mickey Wilkins stepped down as CEO of the Domino Foundation. After twelve incredible years of leading the non-profit Mickey has now decided to look after the sustainability of Domino and has started Domino Business. As of February 2016 the Domino Foundation welcomed in a new CEO, Richard Mun-Gavin, lead pastor of Cogs Church. Not only does Richard bring a wealth of pastoral experience but his passion for people means he’s more than ready to take Domino into a new season of growth.

Shaun Tait has officially moved into the role of  COO and is overseeing the day to day operations of all the programmes and its staff. Although a tall task Shaun has slid into his role with effort and ease.

After heading up the ECD team since its inception Toni Wilkins has decided to focus her attentions on the Life Skills programme and counselling at the Door of Hope Counselling Centre. The team is now been led by the capable Jessica King, who moved over from donor relations. Jessica is more than qualified for the position and brings her unique learnings from her studies, a Bachelor of Social Science in Organisational Psychology and Industrial Sociology and a Foundation Phase Teaching qualification and is currently Clinical Psychology. Jessica also handles the Domino volunteers.

And in the feeding programme Cathy Whittle has taken over the reigns as Programme Manager. Cathy comes from the cooking industry and has the heaps of experience needed to steer the many Domino feeding projects in the right direction. In case you’ve forgotten, that’s our Sandwich Kitchen, Soup Kitchen and Relief Kitchen. Past Project Manager, Brenda Scheepers has moved onto an exciting venture with Domino Business, which you can read more about here.

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